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Dr. Blake Perkins, D.D.S Vancouver, Washington

811 NE 112th Ave Ste 100-A 
Vancouver, WA 98684
(360) 892-7780 
http://bettersleepvancouver.com/

Click Here To Contact Dr. Perkins

Dr. Perkins graduated from Brigham Young University in 1996 with a Bachelors Degree in Conservation Biology. He was then accepted to Case Western Reserve University School of Dentistry, one of the most prestigious dental schools in the country. The United States Air Force took notice of Dr. Perkins and awarded him a Health Professions Scholarship in 1998. After graduating in 2000, Dr. Perkins was accepted into the Air Forces Advanced Education in General Dentistry residency at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, OH. Throughout 2000 and 2001, he practiced under specialists from all areas of dentistry, including Endodontics, Periodontics, Orthodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, and Oral Surgery.

Upon completion of his post-doctoral education, Dr. Perkins served in the Active Duty Air Force at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California as the Base Preventive Dentistry Officer, where he won numerous awards, including Medical Group Company Grade Officer of the Quarter and Medical Operations Squadron Company Grade Officer of the Year. In 2003, he transferred to the Air Force Reserves at McChord Air Force Base in Washington, and returned to start private practice in his hometown of Vancouver, WA. In 2010, Dr. Perkins joined the Air National Guard, and is now the Base Dental Surgeon for the Portland Air National Guard Base, where he continues to proudly serve his country.

Dr. Perkins is continually completing training courses on the latest advances in dentistry so he and his staff can provide you the best dentistry has to offer, combined with the personalized service we all deserve. He is rapidly becoming known as one of Vancouver’s top dentists. He is also Director and CEO of Cascadia Dental Career Institute, Clark Counties first private vocational school for Dental Assistant Training. Now it its 5th year, Cascadia has become known as the place to go for quality vocational training, with dozens of successful graduates enjoying their career in Dentistry!

Dr. Perkins is happily married to his wife Sarah and celebrate their five wonderful children daily. Two of his great loves are the outdoors and teaching youth. His latest hobby is performing as the Lead Vocalist and backup guitar for a local band, Sonic Icebox. Most of all, he loves being a father and husband to his amazing family! He recognizes that he would not be where he is today without each one of them.

Tuesday
Jan272015

Snoring: Health Issues Associated with Snoring, by Dr. Blake Perkins

Snoring: Health Issues Associated with Snoring, by Dr. Blake Perkins from Sequence Media on Vimeo.

Snoring is more than an annoyance to one’s bed partner. There can be some real health issues associated with it. Dr. Blake Perkins of Dental Sleep Medicine of Vancouver, Washington discusses snoring in this report.

 

People usually snore because there is a partial blockage of their upper airway. The usual situation is that the uvula and large palate are enlarged and fall down, making the airway small. Dr. Perkins compares the situation to a sail on a sailboat where a line has come loose, and the sail flaps in the breeze. A person who is asleep is relaxed, and the tissue in the back of the throat is relaxed. It can vibrate and cause the snoring sound.

Dr. Perkins explains that snoring is not always dangerous nor always a sure sign of sleep apnea. However, there is a great percentage of people who snore at night who have an underlying health condition that should be treated. Untreated sleep disorder breathing can have serious effects on a patient’s overall health. There are also some societal costs that can be involved. Among the things that can be involved in sleep disorder problems are hypertension (high blood pressure), diabetes, and periodontal or gum disease. There can also be problems of obesity and other physical or neurological conditions.

A dentist’s approach the problem is to get a history of the patient’s snoring: How long it has been going on and whether it is affecting the patient’s bed partner or others in the house. The next step is to have the patient’s sleep tested by a physician via an overnight sleep study. Once the dentist has the results of the tests, it’s possible to decide how to approach treatment of the sleep disorder.

Dr. Perkins points out that he works with physicians in the study and treatment of sleep disorders affecting his patients. It’s necessary to pursue the problem using a team approach because there is no one single approach to treating a patient. It takes the efforts of a number of people making sure that the best things are always being done for the patient.

J. Blake Perkins, DDS, is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. He is the owner of Today's Family Dentistry of Vancouver, Washington, and he is an expert in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). He spoke with Sleep Better TV, providing online sleep breathing disorder video news content. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Monday
Jan262015

Children and Sleep Apnea: Diagnosis and Treatment

Dr. Blake Perkins treats sleep apnea, a form of cessation of breathing. Most attention is paid to sleep apnea in adults, but children can be—and are—affected by sleep apnea. In this report, Dr. Perkins discusses the effect of this problem on children.

 

About 10% of children snore when they sleep. And 4-6% will have obstructive sleep apnea, a blockage of their breathing while they are asleep. The diagnosis of sleep apnea in children is frequently done by symptoms they exhibit during the waking hours. Often, a child who suffers from obstructive sleep apnea will be irritable or cranky on arising. Morning headaches are common in children who are sleep apnea patients. They may be inattentive at school. Also, children who are sleep deprived sometimes are hyperactive rather than sleepy. They seem to be trying to go everywhere all at once are difficult to manage. Unfortunately, some of these children are diagnosed with ADD or ADHD when the problem is a sleep issue.

Treatment options for children with sleep apnea are different than those for adults. The main cause of this problem in children is usually enlarged tonsils or adenoids. Another possibility is and enlarged palette or dental deformities of the palette itself. The first step in the treatment of sleep apnea in children is referral to an ENT specialist. The ENT can examine the tonsils and adenoids and commonly have those removed. After that treatment, most of the crankiness, headaches, and similar problems vanish because the child will be able to get a quality night’s sleep.

J. Blake Perkins, DDS, is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. He is the owner of Today's Family Dentistry of Vancouver, Washington, and he is an expert in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). He spoke with Sleep Better TV, providing online sleep breathing disorder video news content. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Monday
Jan262015

A Short Guide to Sleeping Disorders, with Dr. Blake Perkins

While sleep apnea is an important—and common—sleep disorder, it is not the only one. In this report, Dr. Blake Perkins discusses other sleep diseases.

 

One of the more basic ones is upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). In UARS, a patient’s upper airway is not as wide as it should be. It is often accompanied by snoring. The next step up in severity is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in which the entire airway is blocked. Another disease is central apnea, in which the brain is not sending the diaphragm the proper message in order to breathe. There is also mixed apnea, which may be a combination of several of these problems.

The treatment of UARS usually involves having the dentist work with an ENT specialist. The ENT may be able to carry out a procedure to open up the airway and improve breathing. The trick is to make the back of the throat larger. UARS may also be treated with a mandibular advancement device. Sometimes the treatment is either/or, sometimes both the procedure and the mandibular device are used together.

Dr. Perkins notes that there are over-the-counter or as-seen-on-TV appliances sold to solve snoring problems. These things are generic mandibular advancement devices not fitted to a particular patient. These appliances will not necessarily fit a patient properly, perhaps causing pain and gum problems. Since there is probably no dental follow-up with these devices, there is the risk down the road of developing bite problems. If there is no attention paid to the effects of the device, there can be long term problems.

J. Blake Perkins, DDS, is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. He is the owner of Today's Family Dentistry of Vancouver, Washington, and he is an expert in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). He spoke with Sleep Better TV, providing online sleep breathing disorder video news content. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Monday
Jan262015

How Does a Dentist Start Treating Sleep Apnea?

 

 

Dr. Blake Perkins is one of a number of dentists who provide treatment for sleep apnea in their patients. But not every dentist does. In this report, he explains how he got started on this particular pathway.

It began for Dr. Perkins when a patient came to see him, inquiring about ways to treat sleep apnea that might be an alternative to the CPAP machine she was using. About the same time, he learned that the husband of one of his office staff was suffering from sleep apnea. He became intrigued about what might be possible from a dental standpoint in the treatment of this sleep disorder, providing an alternative to CPAP.

As to training for this branch of dentistry, Dr. Perkins explains that there little to no training available on the subject when he went to dental school. When Dr. Perkins graduated in 2000, dental schools were not training on this subject. So it’s possible that a number of patients don’t know that dentists even treat this problem.

Then, the problem is finding the right dentist to help with the problem. Dr. Perkins suggests that a patient should ask several questions. The key questions are these: How many times have you done this? How successful are you in treating sleep apnea? And what do your patients say about their results? That last question is probably the most important one.

Dr. Perkins explains that it is very possible to start with the dental appliance and skip the CPAP entirely. That’s why it is so important to get a proper diagnosis of the type os sleep apnea involved. A person with mild to moderate sleep apnea is an ideal candidate for the dental appliance. A patient with severe sleep apnea should certainly start with a CPAP machine. A patient who cannot tolerate CPAP will need to look for some alternative, and that may well be the dental appliance. It may not be a perfect solution, but for a person who cannot use CPAP, any improvement is better than none at all.

J. Blake Perkins, DDS, is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. He is the owner of Today's Family Dentistry of Vancouver, Washington, and he is an expert in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). He spoke with Sleep Better TV, providing online sleep breathing disorder video news content. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Monday
Jan262015

How Dentists Treat Sleep Apnea, with Dr. Blake Perkins

How Dentists Treat Sleep Apnea, with Dr. Blake Perkins from Sequence Media on Vimeo.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common form of apnea. It is something that can be treated by dentists, and Dr. Blake Perkins is a dentist who provides sleep apnea relief for his patients.

 

Dr. Perkins explains that step one is to get a proper diagnosis of the type of sleep apnea that is interfering with a patient’s sleep, whether it’s mild, moderate, or severe. The treatment choice depends on the diagnosis.

In the world of dentistry, the biggest treatment option is to make a mandibular advancement device for a patient with OSA. The device moves the lower jaw forward during sleep. That allows the airway to open and lets the patient get the air need for proper breathing and restful sleep.

The diagnosis of OSA requires a sleep test, probably either a polysomnogram or a home sleep test. The polysomnogram is performed in a laboratory or clinical setting and involves leads on the head belts around the chest. There are other connections, including one on the finger that measures blood oxygenation. The home test, not surprisingly, is a simpler test that can be conducted at home. It involves a small box on the chest and some measurement features, including the measurement of blood oxygenation.

The alternative to the mandibular advancement device is a machine like a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device or a bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) device. The CPAP machine physically blows air through the nose and mouth, physically opening the airway passage. Most insurance policies cover sleep apnea treatment (some including a copay).

J. Blake Perkins, DDS, is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. He is the owner of Dental Sleep Medicine of Vancouver, Washington, and he is an expert in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). He spoke with Sleep Better TV, providing online sleep breathing disorder video news content. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

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